Wednesday, 9 March 2016

How do you solve a problem like Maria?

(Has that title got you humming quietly to yourself?)


So the pin-up girl of tennis has tested positive for a banned substance.  I think that many who saw her press conference when she announced this fact instinctively felt sorry for her.  I know I did.  Many also praised her for being upright and open about it..  But it wasn't all that long before my innate cynicism clicked in.

The substance in question was melodonium.  Melodonium is apparently used to treat heart problems such as angina.  Maria Sharapova claims that she has been taking this for ten years under prescription.  But at least one medical 'expert' (my quotation marks) has said that this drug would be prescribed for short periods only.  In any case, is it likely that a world-class sportswoman will have a heart problem?  For ten years?

Then there is the little matter of how MS acquired this drug.  It is manufactured in Latvia and is not approved for sale in the USA, which is where the young lady has been living for some 12 years or so.

Granted, melodonium was not banned until January this year, but as a professional athlete, MS should have been keeping up to date with the list of banned substances, especially as this one has been on the watch list for some time.

No, her heart-rending pleas during her press conference were, I suggest, worthy of Oscar nomination.

2 comments:

joeh said...

This issue will never end, athletes will always look for an edge, especially when so much money is at stake...she sure is pretty though.

(not necessarily your) Uncle Skip, said...

Love that song.

Oh, the question about athletes and drugs...
I think that athletes should be banned from using any drugs at any time.
If they can't perform without some foreign substance they should have to sit out until such time as they're able.

Either that or make all of the substances that athletes want to put into their bodies okay and then monitor all athletes all of the time so we know the effects.
And make the athletes pay for it.