Sunday, 29 July 2012

Lehargy rules

Indeed, lethargy rules so much that I can't be bothered to correct the typo in the title of this post.  There are numerous jobs from before our trip to France that are still waiting to be done.  Admittedly, some have been started.  I shall have to dredge up some energy from somewhere as several of those unfinished jobs need to be completed by tomorrow evening.

For both the Old Bat and me, one of the pleasures of returning to sunny Brighton is the first sight of the South Downs as we descend Bolney hill on the A23.  Even at night the "line of the Downs so noble and so bare" (Hilaire Belloc) is visible against the light pollution spilling out of the coastal conurbation.  Friday, however, was slightly misty and it was just a little difficult to make out the Downs in the dusk.  This morning, Sunday, I threw open the bedroom curtains and was rewarded by the sight of a magnificent blue sky and sun shining on the sheep and cattle pastures and on the ripening barley.  My camera was not immediately to hand and I decided to wait a while to take a series of photos that I could merge into a panoramic shot with Photoshop.  During breakfast the cloud cover increased and the photo opportunity was lost.  Halfway to the park with the dog, the heavens opened.

Over in the Loire valley, the farmers were working flat out last week and by the time we came home the wheat, barley and oats were all harvested and safely in.  There was still some straw waiting to be baled and some hay was still being turned but otherwise it was almost time to wind down a little before the maize and sunflowers are ready for harvesting in a few weeks.  There were fewer sunflowers in evidence this year but I did manage to get this picture:


5 comments:

Uncle Skip, said...

Maybe this year... I will get a picture of some local sunflowers ...and lavender.


Just maybe;-)

Buck said...

I used to see acres and acres of sunflowers when I was stationed up in North Dakota... and THAT is indeed a sight to behold. Did you know the flowers follow the arc of the sun during the day?

Anonymous said...

I can not thank you adequately for the posts on your web site. I know you'd put a lot of time and effort into them and hope you know how much I appreciate it. I hope I'll do exactly the same for someone else at some point.

#1Nana said...

We have a huge crop of sunflowers in our garden this year. The spouse is growing them to feed the pheasants in the winter.

Brighton Pensioner said...

Buck: yes, I had spotted that.

Nana: you've been busy! Nice to see you back again.